role of the endothelium in neointimal formation : a porcine aortic organ culture study.
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role of the endothelium in neointimal formation : a porcine aortic organ culture study. by Edward Wai-Yan Koo

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Published .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Pagination186 leaves.
Number of Pages186
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14714189M

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A porcine thoracic aortic organ culture system was used to study the interaction between endothelial cells (EC) and the underlying intimal smooth muscle cells (SMC). The presence of EC in organ. The neointimal formation is observed in a porcine aortic organ culture model that exhibits intimal smooth muscle cell accumulation after a brief culture (14). This in vitro change is dependent upon an intact endothelium, as remo-val of the endothelium at the time of harvesting results in failure to develop neointima. The data further indicated.   In Vitro ; 1 1, Koo EYW, Gotlieb AI. Endothelial stimulation of intimal cell prolifer ation in a porcine aortic organ culture. Am J Pathol ; 12, Koo EYW, Gotlieb AI. Neointimal formation in the porcine aortic organ culture:I. Cellular dynamics over one month. Lab Invest ; Gottlieb H, Lalich by: 5.   Studies on intact porcine thoracic aortic organ culture (PAOG) have shown that in the presence of endothelium marked intimal proliferation occurs and following denudation there is reduction of SMC proliferation which is restored by conditioned media from nondenuded organ cultures.

  Endothelial denudation of rabbit aorta induces smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration and proliferation, resulting in a thickened neointima, showing features in common with atherosclerotic lesions. The SMC proliferation has been reported as a transient healing process, which regresses when the neointima is covered by regenerated endothelium. A porcine thoracic aortic organ culture system was used to study the interaction between endothelial cells (EC) and the underlying intimal smooth muscle cells (SMC).   α-SMA positive neointimal formation. Aortic grafts were taken from tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) - treated or non-treated donors, subjected or not subjected to . FIG. 1. Techniques to study the effect of shear stress on the endothelium. (a) Diagram illustrating the perfusable flow system for the application of PS or OS to ECs in vitro. (b) The perfusion system applies shear stress, with pulsating a net directional flow rate of 12 ± 4 dynes/cm 2, characteristic of PS (lower panel); while pulsating shear, with a minimal net directional flow rate of

The biological response of valves to mechanical forces is not well understood. The aim of this study was to design a pulsatile system to enable the ex vivo study of aortic valves when subjected to various hemodynamic conditions. A bioreactor was designed to subject porcine aortic valves to physiological and pathophysiological pressure and flow conditions, while maintaining viability and sterility. The proximal portion of the external iliac arteries at the porcine aortic trifurcation was chosen as the area of interest, because this region has a complicated blood flow field with a range of wall shear stresses and is known to be susceptible to lesion formation (7, 12). such as angioplasty, vascular bypass grafts, and organ trans-plantation (11, 12). The role of the endothelium in normal maintenance of vascular wall integrity is complex. As a con-tinuous monolayer, the endothelium provides structural boundaries to the circulating blood in the lumen and the vascular wall and ensures continued fluid flow by. Neointimal formation was studied in a porcine aortic organ culture model that exhibits intimal smooth muscle cell accumulation after a brief time in culture. This in vitro model is dependent upon an intact endothelium, as removal of the endothelium at the time of harvesting results in the failure to develop a neointima.